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A Galapagos sea lion(Zalophus wollebaeki) sleeps beneath the surface, near Bartholomew Island, Galapagos National Park.

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Tourists watch a sleeping Galapagos giant tortoise (Chelonoidis vicina) on Santa Cruz Island.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) relaxes in the surf on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) soak up the sun on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on Fernandina Island in Galapagos National Park.

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An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Mount Graham red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis. This animal, named Lizzie, is one of only two captive animals of this species. She was brought in to the museum as an orphan along with a male squirrel, by USFWS, in 2004. There are now fewer than 100 MGRS living in the wild, making this one of the rarest mammals in North America.

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Quinceanera party at Our Lady of Guadalupe church, Salt Lake City, Utah. The celebration is a traditional rite of passage for 15-year-old Hispanic girls.

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Volunteers go catatonic at the snap of a hypnotist’s fingers at the Iowa state fair.

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Joel Sartore photographs his son while sleeping at home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Joel Sartore photographs his son while sleeping at home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Resting leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) along the west side of the Antarctic Peninsula.

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Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Portrait of a hibernating Arctic ground squirrel (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Portrait of a hibernating Arctic ground squirrel (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Portrait of a hibernating Arctic ground squirrel (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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After feeding on salmon from a river in Kulik, AK, a grizzly lays down for a nap.

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A juvenile viscacha stretches out after a nap in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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