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A California salema (Haemulon californiensis) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A California salema (Haemulon californiensis) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A giant kelpfish (Heterostichus rostratus) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A giant kelpfish (Heterostichus rostratus) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A red rock shrimp (Lysmata californica) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A red rock shrimp (Lysmata californica) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A five bar cichlid (Neolamprologus tretocephalus) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A five bar cichlid (Neolamprologus tretocephalus) at California Science Center in Los Angeles, California.

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A frosted flatwoods salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum) at the Amphibian Foundation. This is the larval form that was six weeks old when photographed. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

This animal was collected February 26, 2019, in the last remaining wetland for the entire Atlantic clade of frosted flatwoods salamander at Fort Stewart, GA. Frosted flatwoods salamanders have not been detected in Georgia since 2015, and have possibly been extirpated from South Carolina.

The Amphibian Foundation, is an Atlanta-based nonprofit dedicated to the conservation of amphibians in the Southeast United States and across the globe.

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ANI067-00438

A frosted flatwoods salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum) at the Amphibian Foundation. This is the larval form that was six weeks old when photographed. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

This animal was collected February 26, 2019, in the last remaining wetland for the entire Atlantic clade of frosted flatwoods salamander at Fort Stewart, GA. Frosted flatwoods salamanders have not been detected in Georgia since 2015, and have possibly been extirpated from South Carolina.

The Amphibian Foundation, is an Atlanta-based nonprofit dedicated to the conservation of amphibians in the Southeast United States and across the globe.

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ANI067-00437

A frosted flatwoods salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum) at the Amphibian Foundation. This is the larval form that was six weeks old when photographed. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

This animal was collected February 26, 2019, in the last remaining wetland for the entire Atlantic clade of frosted flatwoods salamander at Fort Stewart, GA. Frosted flatwoods salamanders have not been detected in Georgia since 2015, and have possibly been extirpated from South Carolina.

The Amphibian Foundation, is an Atlanta-based nonprofit dedicated to the conservation of amphibians in the Southeast United States and across the globe.

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ANI110-00127

A basin treefrog, Boana lanciformis, from the wild Manaus, Brazil.

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A Himalayan striped squirrel (Tamiops macclellandi) at Tierpark Berlin.

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A Himalayan striped squirrel (Tamiops macclellandi) at Tierpark Berlin.

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A Prince Charles stream frog (Hyloscirtus princecharlesi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Aloag – Tandapi Road, Pichincha Province, Ecuador.

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A Prince Charles stream frog (Hyloscirtus princecharlesi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Aloag – Tandapi Road, Pichincha Province, Ecuador.

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A venter motted rocket frog (Hyloxalus infragutattus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Norte de Bucay, Chimborazo Province, Ecuador. Threats to the species include farming, urban development, and Cacao plantations.

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A venter motted rocket frog (Hyloxalus infragutattus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Norte de Bucay, Chimborazo Province, Ecuador. Threats to the species include farming, urban development, and Cacao plantations.

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A new frog species (Hyloxalus sp. nov. Cerro Masvale) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Cerro Masvale, Guayas Province, Ecuador. Threats to the species include habitat destruction due to mining and urban development.

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A new frog species (Hyloxalus sp. nov. Cerro Masvale) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Cerro Masvale, Guayas Province, Ecuador. Threats to the species include habitat destruction due to mining and urban development.

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A male turtle carapaced marsupial frog (Gastrotheca testudinea) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zunag, Morona Santiago Province, Ecuador.

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A male turtle carapaced marsupial frog (Gastrotheca testudinea) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zunag, Morona Santiago Province, Ecuador.

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Two critically endangered Limon harlequin frogs (Atelopus sp. spumarius complex) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These two animals were originally from San Carlos de Limón, Morona Santiago Province, Ecuador. The captive breeding program has been successful in Centro Jambatu, saving the species from the extinction. The natural habitat of this species faces numerous obstacles, including loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions and farming activities.

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A Chinambi harlequin frog, Atelopus sp. nov. (Chinambi), at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Chinambí, Carchi Province, Ecuador. The known population area occurrence is tiny, and the habitat is affected by habitat destruction, mining activities, and floods in the river system as well.

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A Chinambi harlequin frog, Atelopus sp. nov. (Chinambi), at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Chinambí, Carchi Province, Ecuador. The known population area occurrence is tiny, and the habitat is affected by habitat destruction, mining activities, and floods in the river system as well.

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A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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A limon harlequin toad (Atelopus sp.) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A limon harlequin toad (Atelopus sp.) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A mindo morph of the poison dart frog (Epipedobates darwinwallacei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A mindo morph of the poison dart frog (Epipedobates darwinwallacei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A pants nurse frog (Allobates femoralis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A pants nurse frog (Allobates femoralis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A pucayacu morph of the Darwin-Wallace poison dart frog (Epipedobates darwinwallacei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A pucayacu morph of the Darwin-Wallace poison dart frog (Epipedobates darwinwallacei) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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