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BIR036-00122

Chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica) at the Newport Aquarium.

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Rufous-sided towhee or Eastern towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) at Tall Timbers near Tallahassee.

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A rufous-sided towhee or Eastern towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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A rufous-sided towhee or Eastern towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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A rufous-sided towhee or Eastern towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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BIR049-00078

A swamp sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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A swamp sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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A swamp sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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BIR048-00075

A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered female red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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BIR048-00074

A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered female red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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BIR048-00073

A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered female red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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BIR048-00072

A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered female red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) at Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy.

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ANI040-00574

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered liontailed macaque, Macaca silenus, at Singapore Zoo.

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An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered lion tailed macaque, Macaca silenus, at Singapore Zoo.

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An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered lion tailed macaque (Macaca silenus) at Singapore Zoo.

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ANI040-00570

Western purple-faced langur (Trachypithecus velustus nestor) at the Singapore Zoo.

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Western purple-faced langur (Trachypithecus velustus nestor) at the Singapore Zoo.

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Western purple-faced langur (Trachypithecus velustus nestor) at the Singapore Zoo.

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Western purple-faced langur (Trachypithecus velustus nestor) at the Singapore Zoo.

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ANI040-00420

A critically endangered, male Sumatran orangutan, Pongo abelii, at Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure.

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ANI040-00419

A critically endangered, male Sumatran orangutan, Pongo abelii, at Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure.

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ANI040-00387

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This species exhibits ‘aunting’ behavior, meaning several females will take care of the same baby. The bright orange coloration (which disappears by age six months) is thought to allow for easy tracking of the young one no matter which surrogate mom has it at any time.

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ANI040-00375

Spectacled langur, or dusky leaf monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus) at the Dallas Zoo. Rama is a male, born in 2000. He loves to eat honeysuckle, corn, oatmeal, grapes and bananas. He’s sort of aggressive, dominant, and has to be the boss. His name means ‘God of the monkeys’ and he always wants to be the center of attention, his keepers say. There are only 15 of this species in U.S. Zoos, and fewer than 70 globally. Many of the captive animals are closely related, so U.S. zoos aren’t breeding them anymore.

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ANI040-00374

Spectacled langur, or dusky leaf monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus) at the Dallas Zoo. Rama is a male, born in 2000. He loves to eat honeysuckle, corn, oatmeal, grapes and bananas. He’s sort of aggressive, dominant, and has to be the boss. His name means ‘God of the monkeys’ and he always wants to be the center of attention, his keepers say. There are only 15 of this species in U.S. Zoos, and fewer than 70 globally. Many of the captive animals are closely related, so U.S. zoos aren’t breeding them anymore.

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ANI040-00373

A female dusky leaf-monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus). named Marti at the Dallas Zoo.
There are only 15 of this species in U.S. Zoos, and fewer than 70 globally. Many of the captive animals are closely related, so U.S. zoos aren’t breeding them anymore.

Marti was born in 1996. She is sassy, stubborn, very vocal and loves to eat honeysuckle.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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