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A hibernating female yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) at the hibernation study lab of Dr. Greg Florant at Colorado State University.

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African black-headed oriole (Oriolus larvatus) collected at Chitengo Camp in Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa.

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An African black-headed oriole (Oriolus larvatus) collected at Chitengo Camp in Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa.

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A mountain wagtail, also known as a long-tailed wagtail (Motacilla clara) in Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa.

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Olive sunbird (Cyanomitra olivacea) collected from the Mt. Gorongosa area in Mozambique, Africa.

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PEO020-00136

A brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) trapped by a research team studying rodents for a movement tracking study in Queensland, Australia.

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ANI012-00261

A yellow-footed antechinus (Antechinus flavipes) trapped by a research team for a movement tracking study near Petrie, Queensland.

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A northern brown bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus), trapped by a research team for a movement tracking study near Petrie, Queensland.

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A black rat (Rattus rattus) captured during a tracking study near Petrie, Queensland.

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Biologist scout for federally-endangered birds at Kissemmee Prarie State Park.

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Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00244

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00245

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00235

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00236

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00237

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00238

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00239

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00240

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00241

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00242

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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Red knot (Calidris canutus ssp. rufa), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00186

Red knot (Calidris canutus ssp. rufa), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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A biologist holds a bat that was killed by a wind turbine on a wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Biologists calculate that an average of 32 bats and nearly 5 birds are killed per turbine per season here, having a deadly effect on migrating wildlife.

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A road-killed bobcat (Lynx rufus) that has been placed along a highway near the Santa Anna NWR. USFWS biologists are conducting a study to determine how often passers will to pick up and take a dead bobcat, which often is just a few minutes. This may be skewing biologist’s road kill statistics.

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Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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ANI072-00016

Hibernating Arctic ground squirrels (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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Portrait of a hibernating Arctic ground squirrel (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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ANI072-00014

Portrait of a hibernating Arctic ground squirrel (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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ANI072-00013

Portrait of a hibernating Arctic ground squirrel (Spermopilus parryii) at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. This animal is the grand champion of all hibernators. It’s the only mammal that can drop its body temperature to below freezing. They hibernate for seven months. Females go in first, in August. Males follow a month later. They come out again to feed on tundra plants in May. Biologists at UAF have been studying the animal for 20 years, but still can’t figure out how this animal maintains a flat body temperature for all those months just above freezing. “You could put people into hibernation for space trips if you could understand it better,” said Franziska ‘Fran’ Kohl, one of the biologists here. “They also show symptoms of Alzheimers during hibernation.” She added that traumatic head injuries heal when in hibernation, another thing scientists are trying to figure out.

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A 10-year-old girl works on a computer in a dark room.

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Dead Sandhill cranes at Rowe Audubon Sactuary near Kearney, Nebraska

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Researchers use binoculars to search for peregrine falcon chicks along the Colville River. The researchers band the chicks in order to track what habitat the birds are using repeatedly and how old the birds are when they return to the nest.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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