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BIR021-00056

Researchers band a peregrine falcon chick in order to track what habitat the birds are using repeatedly and how old the birds are when they return to the nest.

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BIR032-00147

White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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BIR032-00146

White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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BIR032-00145

White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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PEO004-00356

Students at North Carolina State University read the newspaper as part of a class assignment.

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PEO004-00355

Students at North Carolina State University read the newspaper as part of a class assignment.

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PEO004-00354

Students at North Carolina State University read the newspaper as part of a class assignment.

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PEO004-00353

Students at North Carolina State University read the newspaper as part of a class assignment.

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PEO004-00352

Students at North Carolina State University read the newspaper as part of a class assignment.

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ENV015-00002

Scientists at the Toolik Research Center study the effects of global warming on the tundra. If the permafrost melts, the amount of carbon released into the air could make man-madeemissions look trivial, the scientists said. Shown are botanists studying a thermokarst in which the permafrost has melted away

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ENV015-00001

Scientists at the Toolik Research Center study the effects of global warming on the tundra. If the permafrost melts, the amount of carbon released into the air could make man-madeemissions look trivial, the scientists said. Shown are botanists studying tundra plants by the square meter.

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ENV006-00023

Live birds serve as bait in a raven study area in Prudhoe Bay. The oil industry sponsors projects to trap and radio tag the birds in order to learn more about them. Ravens are quite disruptive to the oil industry, often dropping wire and nesting material into power transformers.

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BIR040-00009

A researcher studies eagles while wearing a camouflage cover.

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A researcher studies eagles while wearing a camouflage cover.

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BIR040-00008

A researcher studies eagles while wearing a camouflage cover.

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BIR040-00007

A researcher studies eagles while wearing a camouflage cover.

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BIR033-00143

A researcher examines peregrine falcon chicks in a nest on Alaska’s North Slope.

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BIR032-00061

A white-fronted goose runs to freedom after being leg-banded by biologists. Annual goose surveys take place in the Teshekpuk Lake area, home to critical nesting habitat for many species of waterfowl.

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BIR032-00059

Biologists gather white-fronted geese to band and test for the avian flu in Alaska’s North Slope near Teshukpuk Lake.

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BIR032-00060

Biologists gather white-fronted geese to band and test for the avian flu in Alaska’s North Slope near Teshukpuk Lake.

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BIR032-00057

White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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BIR032-00058

White-fronted geese under go capture and leg banding by biologists on the western part of the Slope near Teshukpuk Lake. The on going study has surveyed the population, age and health of several goose species for decades in hope of better managing the flocks.

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BEA012-00033

Biologist Dick Shideler studies tranquilized Grizzly Bears in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Biologist Dick Shideler studies tranquilized Grizzly Bears in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Biologist Dick Shideler studies tranquilized Grizzly Bears in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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BEA012-00024

Biologists collared this tranquilized grizzly bear near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on the Arctic coastal plain. They are studying how the bears live with the oil fields in the area.

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BEA012-00025

Biologists weigh and collar a tranquilized grizzly bear near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on the Arctic coastal plain. They arestudying how the bears live with the oil fields in the area.

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BEA012-00023

Biologists collared this tranquilized grizzly bear near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on the Arctic coastal plain. They are studying how the bears live with the oil fields in the area.

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BEA012-00022

Biologists collar a tranquilized grizzly bear near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska on the Arctic coastal plain. They are studying how the bears live with the oil fields in the area.

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ANI009-00030

Biologist Brian deLong reaches into a Northern fur seal rookery with a pole to retrieve a dead pup for necropsy on St. George Island in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands. Both seal and sea lion populations have declined sharply in recent years due to human overfishing.

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Biologist Terry Spraker looks out over a Northern fur sealrookery on St. George Island in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands. Both seal and sea lion populations have declined sharply inrecent years due to human overfishing.

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ANI009-00029

Biologist Brian deLong reaches into a Northern fur seal rookery with a pole to retrieve a dead pup for necropsy on St. George Island in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands. Both seal and sea lion populations have declined sharply in recent years due to human overfishing.

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ANI009-00027

Biologist Terry Spraker (background) and his assistant Brian deLong reach into a Northern fur seal rookery with a pole to retrieve a dead pup for necropsy on St. George Island in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands. Both seal and sea lion populations have declined sharply in recent years due to human overfishing.

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Biologist Terry Spraker and his assistant Brian deLong examine a female Northern fur seal killed by two males in a rookery on St. George Island in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands. Both seal and sea lion populations have declined sharply in recent years due to human overfishing.

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ANI009-00025

Biologist Terry Spraker reaches into a Northern fur seal rookery with a pole to retrieve a dead pup for necropsy on St.George Island in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands. Both seal and sea lion populations have declined sharply in recent years due to human overfishing.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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