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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A man and woman out searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A lion feeds on a cow carcass in Queen Elizabeth National Park.

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A lion feeds on a cow carcass in Queen Elizabeth National Park.

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Captive breeding tanks for endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa).

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Attwater’s prairie-chicken (Endangered under the Federal ESA) at the Houston Zoo.

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An endangered Attwater’s prairie-chicken over one of its last booming grounds in Texas’ coastal prairie.

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Endangered Attwater’s prairie chickens mate, giving their species one more chance for survival. (Near Texas City, TX.)

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The nest of a captive female Attwater’s prairie-chicken (endangered.) Few of these eggs will hatch, and few of the surviving chicks will make it to adulthood.

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A male Attwater’s prairie-chicken watches the sky for predators. The endangered birds depend on native coastal prairiegrasses for food and a place to hide from predators.

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The endangered Attwater’s prairie-chicken needs short grass to see other members of its species as well as predators. Biologists rotate cattle grazing to simulate the bison that once kept the prairie trimmed.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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