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A variable mud turtle (Pelusios rhodesianus) from a private collection.

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A variable mud turtle (Pelusios rhodesianus) from a private collection.

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ANI104-00356

An Ivory Coast mud turtle (Pelusios cupulatta) from a private collection.

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A Darwin snake-necked turtle (Chelodina kurrichalpongo) from a private collection. This species was recently described, in 2019.

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A Darwin snake-necked turtle (Chelodina kurrichalpongo) from a private collection. This species was recently described, in 2019.

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A Darwin snake-necked turtle (Chelodina kurrichalpongo) from a private collection. This species was recently described, in 2019.

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ANI104-00345

A Southern black-knobbed map turtle (Graptemys nigrinoda delticola) from a private collection.

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A half-day-old hatchling leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) from Bioko Island. (IUCN: Critically Endangered, US: Endangered)

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A half-day-old hatchling leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) from Bioko Island. (IUCN: Critically Endangered, US: Endangered)

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ANI110-00142

A critically endangered giant water frog (Telmatobius gigas) collected near Oruro, Bolivia, photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic. The name gigas means ‘big’, and refers to the giant tadpoles of this species, not the adults.

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ANI110-00141

A critically endangered giant water frog (Telmatobius gigas) collected near Oruro, Bolivia, photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic. The name gigas means ‘big’, and refers to the giant tadpoles of this species, not the adults.

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ANI110-00140

An undescribed Telmatobius sp., collected near Oruro, Bolivia, photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

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ANI110-00139

An undescribed Telmatobius sp., collected near Oruro, Bolivia, photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

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ANI110-00138

A Sucre water frog (Telmatobius simonsi) from Sucre, Bolivia photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

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ANI110-00137

A Sucre water frog (Telmatobius simonsi) from Sucre, Bolivia photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

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ANI110-00136

An undescribed Telmatobius sp., a new species of water frog from Potosi, Bolivia photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

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ANI110-00135

An undescribed Telmatobius sp., a new species of water frog from Potosi, Bolivia photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

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ANI110-00134

An undescribed Telmatobius sp., a new species of water frog from Potosi, Bolivia photographed at at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. This species is totally aquatic.

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ANI110-00133

Romeo, a ten-year-old Sehuencas water frog (Telmatobius yuracare) at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. Romeo had been thought to be the very last of his kind until a female named Juliet and four other animals were discovered in December of 2018.

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ANI110-00132

Romeo, a ten-year-old Sehuencas water frog (Telmatobius yuracare) at Museo De Historia Natural Alcide d’Orbigny, a natural history museum and rare amphibian breeding center in Chocabamba Bolivia. Romeo had been thought to be the very last of his kind until a female named Juliet and four other animals were discovered in December of 2018.

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A wild caught orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in Missouri.

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A Northern ronquil (Ronquilus jordani) at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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A Northern ronquil (Ronquilus jordani) at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) swimming in the Bighorn Creek, in the Wigwam River drainage in British Columbia. This is one of the last, best places for spawning of the vulnerable (ICUN) and federally-threatened bull trout, and is part of the Kootenay River system, which sees an annual migration of bull trout from Lake Koocanusa, some fifty miles away. The fish prefer very cold water of 40 degrees or so in order to spawn, and the springs in this area provide that. Ram Creek flows into the Wigwam, and between the two of them they support some 5,000 bull trout.

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Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) from the Toledo Zoo, Toldeo, Ohio.

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A Bifurcated cave amphipod (Stygobromus bifurcatus) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo.
Originally from the Robertson Windmill Well, near Salado, Texas. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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Ezell’s cave amphipod (Stygobromus flagellatus) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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A Reddell’s caecidotea (Caecidotea reddelli) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo. Originally from Hidden Springs 3, in Texas.

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Peck’s cave amphipod (Stygobromus pecki) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo. Originally from the Comal Springs near New Braunfels, TX.
This species is endangered on the IUCN Red List.

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Mexican blindcat (Prietella phreatophila) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo.
This species is endangered on the IUCN Red List as well as on the US Federal list.

This stygobitic catfish is known from about a dozen sites in Coahuila, Mexico and is listed as endangered in both Mexico and the United States. A single population (represented by this individual) was recently discovered in Val Verde County, Texas, after two decades of searching by cave biologists. The San Antonio Zoo Department of Conservation and Research (SAZ DOCR) maintains a captive colony of this species, including two individuals that have been in captivity for over twenty years. Members of the Blindcat Working Group (a multinational team of researchers) are exploring the geographic distribution and population genetics of this species using eDNA, Next Generation sequencing, and boots-on-the-ground field efforts.

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FIS017-00143

Mexican blindcat (Prietella phreatophila) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo.
This species is endangered on the IUCN Red List as well as on the US Federal list.

This stygobitic catfish is known from about a dozen sites in Coahuila, Mexico and is listed as endangered in both Mexico and the United States. A single population (represented by this individual) was recently discovered in Val Verde County, Texas, after two decades of searching by cave biologists. The San Antonio Zoo Department of Conservation and Research (SAZ DOCR) maintains a captive colony of this species, including two individuals that have been in captivity for over twenty years. Members of the Blindcat Working Group (a multinational team of researchers) are exploring the geographic distribution and population genetics of this species using eDNA, Next Generation sequencing, and boots-on-the-ground field efforts.

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A Salado salamander (Eurycea chisholmensis) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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A Salado salamander (Eurycea chisholmensis) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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A Salado salamander (Eurycea chisholmensis) at the Conservation Department of the San Antonio Zoo. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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