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ANI110-00112

A common Suriname toad (Pipa pipa) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Shiripuno, Orellana Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00111

A common Suriname toad (Pipa pipa) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Shiripuno, Orellana Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00110

A common Suriname toad (Pipa pipa) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Shiripuno, Orellana Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00016

A critically endangered Morona Santiago subfoot toad (Atelopus halihelos) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador. This is a very rare species and it was the only individual in captivity at the time this photograph was taken (January 2019).

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ANI110-00015

A critically endangered Morona Santiago subfoot toad (Atelopus halihelos) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador. This is a very rare species and it was the only individual in captivity at the time this photograph was taken (January 2019).

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ANI110-00012

A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00011

A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00010

A female Epibatidin dart poison frog (Epipedobates anthonyi) Santa Marta morph, at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Marta, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00009

An endangered Mazán harlequin toad (Atelopus exiguus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Parque Nacional Cajas, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The population used to be very common but now there are only six individuals known. They are breeding yet and extremely hard to find in the wild. Habitat loss (from agriculture, dams, or climate change), chytridiomycosis, and invasive trout are threats.

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ANI110-00008

An endangered Mazán harlequin toad (Atelopus exiguus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Parque Nacional Cajas, Azuay Province, Ecuador. The population used to be very common but now there are only six individuals known. They are breeding yet and extremely hard to find in the wild. Habitat loss (from agriculture, dams, or climate change), chytridiomycosis, and invasive trout are threats.

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ANI110-00007

A critically endangered Jambato toad (Atelopus ignescens) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Angamarca in the Cotopaxi Province of Ecuador. This species used to be very common during the early 1980s but it was not seen for 28 years in the wild (between 1988 and 2016). However, one more wild population was found in 2016. A wild pair laid a clutch of eggs (about 600) in captivity in 2017, and nearly 200 juveniles are successfully growing and reaching adulthood at the time this photo was taken (in January 2019) at Centro Jambatu. This species could have been negatively affected by a global warming and also possible pathogens.

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ANI110-00006

A critically endangered Jambato toad (Atelopus ignescens) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Angamarca in the Cotopaxi Province of Ecuador. This species used to be very common during the early 1980s but it was not seen for 28 years in the wild (between 1988 and 2016). However, one more wild population was found in 2016. A wild pair laid a clutch of eggs (about 600) in captivity in 2017, and nearly 200 juveniles are successfully growing and reaching adulthood at the time this photo was taken (in January 2019) at Centro Jambatu. This species could have been negatively affected by a global warming and also possible pathogens.

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ANI110-00005

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00004

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00003

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00002

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI110-00001

A giant Blomberg toad (Rhaebo blombergi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Siete Cascadas, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. A very large toad species, easily measuring up to 25 cm. Local people claim it has measured up to 40cm. The species is declining due to deforestation and agricultural activities, especially palm plantations. Other threats include mining and the introduction of exotic species to the wild.

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ANI101-00499

A limon harlequin toad (Atelopus sp.) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00498

A limon harlequin toad (Atelopus sp.) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00474

Oriental fire-bellied toad (Bombina orientalis) at the Denver Zoo.

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ANI101-00470

A critically endangered webbed harlequin frog (Atelopus palmatus) at Centro Jambatu.

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ANI076-00021

A pair of juvenile Yosemite toads (Bufo or Anaxyrus canorus) at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at U.C. Berkeley. (IUCN: EN)

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ANI101-00403

Cuban crested toad (Peltophryne peltocephala) at the Moscow Zoo.

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Cuban crested toad (Peltophryne peltocephala) at the Moscow Zoo.

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ANI101-00401

Cuban crested toad (Peltophryne peltocephala) at the Moscow Zoo.

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ANI101-00400

Cuban crested toad (Peltophryne peltocephala) at the Moscow Zoo.

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ANI101-00394

European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata) at the Moscow Zoo.

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ANI101-00393

European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata) at the Moscow Zoo.

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ANI101-00384

Crucifix Toad (Notaden bennettii) at the Melbourne Zoo

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ANI101-00383

Crucifix Toad (Notaden bennettii) at the Melbourne Zoo

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ANI101-00382

Crucifix Toad (Notaden bennettii) at the Melbourne Zoo

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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