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A family of five pose for a portrait on railroad tracks.

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An elementary aged boy poses for a portrait on railroad tracks.

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Sea turtle tracks on Floreana Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A truck prepares to drive through some ranch land in the Nebraska Sandhills.

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A snow covered road at the Wild Canid Survival and Research Center.

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A snow covered road at the Wild Canid Survival and Research Center.

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A snow covered road at the Wild Canid Survival and Research Center.

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A biologist radio collars a lioness in the Ishasha Section of Queen Elizabeth National Park.

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Tracks along the beach on Floreana Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A snow covered road at the Wild Canid Survival and Research Center.

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A mountain biker and tire tracks that threaten to destroy living desert crust near Arches National Park, Utah.

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A person running on a roof top track at the Boston Racquet Club.

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A fisheries technician for dam owner Avista, uses a radio antenna to track tagged bull trout in a stream that feeds into Noxon Reservoir. Biologists track a handful of tagged fish daily to try and learn about their migratory movements, which a series of dams on the nearby Clark Fork River have severely impeded.

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A biologist holds a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), captured for a study near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists tag a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) tracks on a nesting beach.

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Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) tracks on a nesting beach.

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Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) tracks on a nesting beach.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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Tire tracks through a sand sage prairie pasture near Laverne, OK.

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Tire tracks through a sand sage prairie pasture near Laverne, OK.

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A three-year-old plays with a train set on a wood floor.

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A three-year-old plays with a train set on a wood floor.

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The footprint of a wild gray wolf in the snow in Yellowstone National Park.

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Wolf biologist David Mech tracks reintroduced gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

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Wolf biologist David Mech tracks reintroduced gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

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Wolf biologist David Mech tracks reintroduced gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

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Pawprint of a gray wolf surrounded by ferns on the floor of the old-growth rainforest of Clayoquot Sound, Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada.)

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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