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Native Americans use traditional dip-netting methods to fish for salmon on the Deschuttes River, a tributary of the Columbia. They often throw back their catch of wild salmon.

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Native Americans use traditional dip-netting methods to fish for salmon on the Deschuttes River, a tributary of the Columbia. They often throw back their catch of wild salmon.

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Native Americans use traditional dip-netting methods to fish for salmon on the Deschuttes River, a tributary of the Columbia. They often throw back their catch of wild salmon.

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Native Americans use traditional dip-netting methods to fish for salmon on the Deschuttes River, a tributary of the Columbia. They often throw back their catch of wild salmon.

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Salmon heads washed up on the banks of the Columbia river at a Native American fish-cleaning site near Celilo, OR.

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Salmon heads washed up on the banks of the Columbia river at a Native American fish-cleaning site near Celilo, OR.

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Salmon heads washed up on the banks of the Columbia river at a Native American fish-cleaning site near Celilo, OR.

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Jaime, a boy whose family saved their forest and harvests its fruit, holds up a piquia fruit. (Quiandeua, Brazil.)

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Jaime, a boy whose family saved their forest and harvests its fruit, holds up a piquia fruit. (Quiandeua, Brazil.)

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Jaime, a boy whose family saved their forest and harvests its fruit, holds up a piquia fruit. (Quiandeua, Brazil.)

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Forest fruit is cleaned and prepared for market along the Capim River, a tributary of the Brazilian Amazon.

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Pupunha fruit is transported to a market near Belem, Brazil.

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Forest fruits are moved by dugout canoe from the small village of Quiandeua to the city markets down river.

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Forest fruit is cleaned and prepared for market along the Capim River, a tributary of the Brazilian Amazon.

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Forest fruits are moved by dugout canoe from the small village of Quiandeua to the bigger markets down river. Forest fruits are craved by many city dwellers–they’re willing to pay premium prices for good quality fruit delivered to Saturday morning markets.

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A local hunter/gatherer stands next to a friend in the forests of the Brazilian Amazon.

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Forest fruits are moved by horseback from the small villageof Quiandeua to the bigger markets down river.

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A local hunter/gatherer carries pupunha fruit he collected with his children in the forests of the Brazilian Amazon.

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A local hunter/gatherer carries pupunha fruit he collected with his children in the forests of the Brazilian Amazon.

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Shot through the lower back, a wounded caribou drags himself along the beach near Point Lay on far west side of the Slope. After butchering, the animal’s head was left behind as the meat was carried away.

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Shot through the lower back, a wounded caribou drags himself along the beach near Point Lay on far west side of the Slope.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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