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At Anastasia Island State Park trapping the federally endangered Anastasia Island beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus phasma).

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A zig-zag spider (Neoscona cooksoni) on Floreana Island, in Galapagos National Park. The zig-zag is a species endemic to the Galapagos.

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A zig-zag spider (Neoscona cooksoni) on North Seymour, in Galapagos National Park. The zig-zag is a species endemic to the Galapagos.

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A zig-zag spider (Neoscona cooksoni) preys on a juvenile painted locust (Schistocerca melanocera) on Santa Cruz Island.

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A zig-zag spider (Neoscona cooksoni) on Floreana Island, in Galapagos National Park. The zig-zag is a species endemic to the Galapagos.

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A zig-zag spider (Neoscona cooksoni) on Floreana Island, in Galapagos National Park. The zig-zag is a species endemic to the Galapagos.

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A zig-zag spider (Neoscona cooksoni) on North Seymour, in Galapagos National Park. The zig-zag is a species endemic to the Galapagos.

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Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) caught in fishing nets in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

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ANI082-00086

A bobcat (Lynx rufus) photographed by a camera trap along the Tex-Mex border wall. The border wall cuts through many places of the last habitat left along the lower Rio Grande river, the wall is a huge impediment to the movement of wildlife species that can’t fly over it.

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A female bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) is caught by biologists using a mist net, near Wood River, Nebraska. Avian ecologists trap and put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, on male bobolinks. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists tag a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A biologist holds a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), captured for a study near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) photographed by a camera trap along the Texas-Mexico border in Texas. Cutting in many places through the last of the habitat left along the lower Rio Grande river, the wall is a huge impediment to the movement of wildlife species that can’t fly over it. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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ANI082-00049

Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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ANI082-00050

Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Cowbirds (Molothrus sp.) that were caught in traps set for them at Fort Hood Army Base near Kileen, TX. Of these cowbirds, the females will be killed and the males will be kept to lure other birds. The eradication of cowbirds has been going on for awhile here in an effort to study the effect of their parasitism on endangered birds like the black-capped vireo and golden-cheeked warbler.

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BIR023-00035

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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BIR023-00032

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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BIR023-00031

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

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Biologists relocate a tranquilized red wolf (endangered) near Manteo, North Carolina.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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