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The flower of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens). This is one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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Endangered (US and IUCN) golden-cheeked warblers (Dendroica chrysoparia) Killeen, Texas.

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Siskiyou National Forest serves as home and protector to wildlife including the federally endangered northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina).

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A federally endangered key tree cactus (Pilosocereus robinii), a species found only in Key Largo.

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A three-year-old female koala is trapped in a tree in a the front yard of a house in Petrie, Queensland.

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The Sunshine Coast Koala Rescue team pulls a female koala with conjunctivitis out of a tree in Kilcoy, Australia. She’ll be treated and released to a safe area once she’s healed.

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A gold-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas) at the Miller Park Zoo. The future of this species is quite uncertain as it is going to be ‘phased out’ in favor of other more showy and popular small primate species.

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A yellow-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas) at the Miller Park Zoo. The future of this species is quite uncertain as it is going to be ‘phased out’ in favor of other more showy and popular small primate species.

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Female black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) in the Pantanal, Brazil.

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Joel Sartore’s photo of a tree-climbing lion in Africa’s Albertine Rift is featured on the cover of the 50 Greatest Pictures special issue of National Geographic magazine.

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The opening spread of the Albertine Rift article, from the November, 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine

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Trees growing out of volcanic rock on Tower Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) on San Cristobal Island (formerly known as Chatham Island).

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A Galapagos mockingbird (Mimus parvulus) on Santa Cruz Island, on the edge of Galapagos National Park.

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A yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) taking off at Tagus Cove in Galapagos National Park.

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A medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A large ground finch (Geospiza magnirostris) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island, Galapagos National Park.

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A yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) at Tagus Cove in Galapagos National Park.

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A large ground finch (Geospiza magnirostris) on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island, Galapagos National Park.

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A yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) at Tagus Cove in Galapagos National Park.

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A large ground finch (Geospiza magnirostris) preparing for flight on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) at Tagus Cove in Galapagos National Park.

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A large ground finch (Geospiza magnirostris) in flight on Urbina Bay, Isabela Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A female small ground finch (Geospiza fuliginosa) on Rabida Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A female small ground finch (Geospiza fuliginosa) on Rabida Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A large ground finch (Geospiza magnirostris) on Rabida Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Daniel de Granville, Joel’s assistant, hangs from a climbing harness while adjusting a remote camera to photograph a jabiru stork’s nest (right) in Brazil’s Pantanal.

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Assistant Daniel De Granville climbs to a tree platform next to a jabiru stork nest in Brazil’s Pantanal.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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