Dear Friends: We are still open for business, but it might take longer to fill your orders and requests as we have shifted to minimal staffing as a precaution against COVID-19. We appreciate your patience.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA007-00569

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA007-00570

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA007-00571

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA007-00572

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar (Mespilus canescens), one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA031-00032

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens, one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA031-00033

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens, one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA031-00035

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens, one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA031-00036

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens, one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA031-00037

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens, one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA031-00038

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens, one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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PLA031-00039

Images of a blooming Stern’s medlar bush (Mespilus canescens, one of the rarest plants in the U.S. This plant is now reduced to just 25 specimens in two locations. This one is located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Gardens.

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A hawthorn (Crataegus collina) in Werner Park, Nashville, TN.

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A young boy kneels proudly in his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A young boy stands proudly in his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A young boy stands on a ladder by his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A young boy climbs a ladder to his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A young boy climbing a ladder to his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A young boy stand proudly in his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A young boy stands proudly in his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A young boy kneels proudly in his treehouse at his home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Retirees frolic in a pool at the Fun N Sun Resort in San Benito, one of many border communities that attract “winter Texans” from the north every fall.

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A ranch hand holds a dorado he has caught in the flooded forest on Barra Bansa ranch in Brazil.

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An elderly man gathers oranges in California’s citrus growing belt.

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An aerial of bayou DeView, where there have been ivory billed woodpecker sightings in Arkansas.

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A clear-cut in Salmon National Forest, Idaho. The reserve covers a 1.8- million -acre tract.

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An eastern hognose snake plays dead on the Snake Road, a three-mile stretch of road in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. To prevent herp deaths, this section of road is closed in the spring and fall when snakes are migrating.

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An Eastern ringnecked snake (Diadophis punctatus edwardsii) found on the Snake Road, near Ware, Illinois. This three mile stretch of road is closed to traffic when the snakes are migrating from limestone cliffs to the swamp nearby.

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An eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) plays dead on the Snake Road, a three-mile stretch of road in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. To prevent herp deaths, this section of road is closed in the spring and fall when snakes are migrating.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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ANI082-00117

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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ANI082-00118

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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ANI082-00120

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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ANI082-00121

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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