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Two American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), in the Floreana Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Two American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), in the Floreana Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) swim along Floreana Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A pair of waved albatross, also known as Galapagos albatross, (Phoebastria irrorata) in one of the primary nesting grounds on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park. This species nests only on the island of Espanola and one other small island in the Galapagos.

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A pair of waved albatross, also known as Galapagos Albatross, (Phoebastria irrorata) in one of the primary nesting grounds on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park. This species nests only on the island of Espanola and one other small island in the Galapagos.

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The hood mockingbird, also known as the Espanola mockingbird, (Mimus macdonaldi) is a very rare bird species that’s found only on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Lava birds (Leucophaeus fuliginosus) on San Cristobal Island (formerly known as Chatham Island). Lava gulls are one of the rarest birds in the world with a population of less than 300. The bird is only found in the Galapagos Islands.

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Lava birds (Leucophaeus fuliginosus) on San Cristobal Island (formerly known as Chatham Island). Lava gulls are one of the rarest birds in the world with a population of less than 300. The bird is only found in the Galapagos Islands.

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One of the rarest birds in the world, the lava gull (Leucophaeus fuliginosus) on Santa Cruz Island, on the edge of Galapagos National Park.

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One of the rarest birds in the world, the lava gull (Leucophaeus fuliginosus) on Santa Cruz Island, on the edge of Galapagos National Park.

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Tourist look on as a pair of very old Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis vicina) mate at the Charles Darwin Research Station, on Santa Cruz Island, at the edge of Galapagos National Park.

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Brown noddy terns (Anous stolidus) at Tagus Cove in Galapagos National Park.

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Two swimmers surface in the water close to Santiago Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Two swimmers surface in the water close to Santiago Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus) at Tagus Cove in Galapagos National Park.

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Magnificent frigate birds (Fregata magnificens) near Fernandina Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Galapagos fur seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) on Isabella Island in Galapagos National Park.

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The webbed feet of the Blue-footed booby bird (Sula nebouxii) on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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One of a mated pair of blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii) does a mating dance on North Seymour, in the Galapagos Islands.

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Swallow-tailed gulls (Creagrus furcatus) on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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The webbed feet of the Blue-footed booby bird (Sula nebouxii) on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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Swallow-tail gull (Creagrus furcatus) with hungry chick, on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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Swallow-tail gull (Creagrus furcatus) with hungry chick, on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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Swallow-tail gull (Creagrus furcatus) with hungry chick, on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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Swallow-tail gull (Creagrus furcatus) with chick, on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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A pair of guinea pigs at the Capital Humane Society in Lincoln.

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Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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A federally endangered Olulu or Alula (Brighamia insignis), at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, DC. This endangered Hawaiian plant now has to be hand pollenated because botanist believe that its pollinator is extinct. This plant was freshly cut by USGB and is exuding a milky substance similar to a milkweed were it was trimmed.

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A federally endangered Olulu or Alula (Brighamia insignis), at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, DC. This endangered Hawaiian plant now has to be hand pollenated because botanist believe that its pollinator is extinct. This plant was freshly cut by USGB and is exuding a milky substance similar to a milkweed were it was trimmed.

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Peyote cactus (Lophophora williamsii) at the U.S. Botanical Garden Production Facility in Washington, DC.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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