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Swallow-tail gull (Creagrus furcatus) with chick, on North Seymour Island, part of the Galapagos Chain.

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A pair of guinea pigs at the Capital Humane Society in Lincoln.

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Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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Miami blue butterfly (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri). This species is being captive bred at the McGuire Center at the Univ. of Florida. Thousands have been released into the wild in South Florida over the past three years. So far, results are indeterminate. Fewer than 250 exist in the wild, making it one of the rarest butterflies in North America.

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The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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The federally endangered Iowa Pleistocene Snail (Discus macclintocki). This is a relict from the last ice age, some 400,000 years ago. It lives in cold air vents on 37 different hillsides in Iowa (and one in Illinois) and survives only in the cold air that blows past underground ice and out of the cracks in limestone cliffs.

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A federally endangered Olulu or Alula (Brighamia insignis), at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, DC. This endangered Hawaiian plant now has to be hand pollenated because botanist believe that its pollinator is extinct. This plant was freshly cut by USGB and is exuding a milky substance similar to a milkweed were it was trimmed.

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A federally endangered Olulu or Alula (Brighamia insignis), at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, DC. This endangered Hawaiian plant now has to be hand pollenated because botanist believe that its pollinator is extinct. This plant was freshly cut by USGB and is exuding a milky substance similar to a milkweed were it was trimmed.

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Peyote cactus (Lophophora williamsii) at the U.S. Botanical Garden Production Facility in Washington, DC.

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Barrens topminnow (Fundulus julisia) at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. This species is endangered (IUCN). It is only found in the Barrens Plateau in middle Tennessee, making it one of the rarest fish in eastern North America.

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Slackwater darter (Etheostoma boschungi), an endangered (IUCN) and federally threatened species, at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. The male is colorful and much larger than the female.

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Slackwater darter (Etheostoma boschungi), an endangered (IUCN) and federally threatened species, at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. The male is colorful and much larger than the female.

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Slackwater darter (Etheostoma boschungi), an endangered (IUCN) and federally threatened species, at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. The male is colorful and much larger than the female.

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Cape Fear shiner (Notropis mekistocholas) an endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered species at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

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Relict darter (Etheostoma chienense) a federally threatened species at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. The female is smaller than the male in with her.

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Relict darter (Etheostoma chienense) a federally threatened species at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center. The female is smaller than the male in with her.

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Boulder darter (Etheostoma wapiti), a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered species, at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

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Boulder darter (Etheostoma wapiti), a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered species, at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

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Cape Fear shiner (Notropis mekistocholas) an endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered species at Conservation Fisheries, a native stream fish breeding center.

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An endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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An endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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A hawthorn (Crataegus collina) in Werner Park, Nashville, TN.

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Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00242

Red knot (Calidris canutus), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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