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ANI110-00089

A pacific toad (Ceratophrys stolzmanni) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Reserva Ecologica militar Arenillas, El Oro Province, Ecuador.
This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. It is a rare species in nature and little known due to its biology. It is active only in the rainy season. However, Ecuadorian populations may be declining as a result of the destruction and fragmentation of dry coastal forests, urban growth, the use of agrochemicals.

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ANI110-00088

A pacific toad (Ceratophrys stolzmanni) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Reserva Ecologica militar Arenillas, El Oro Province, Ecuador.
This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. It is a rare species in nature and little known due to its biology. It is active only in the rainy season. However, Ecuadorian populations may be declining as a result of the destruction and fragmentation of dry coastal forests, urban growth, the use of agrochemicals.

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ANI110-00058

A yellow spotted cochran frog (Sachatamia albomaculata) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Quininde, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00057

A yellow spotted cochran frog (Sachatamia albomaculata) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Quininde, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00056

A sun glass frog (Hyalinobatrachium aureoguttatum) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Durango, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Despite its local abundance in several sites and its adaptability to a certain degree of modification, this species faces serious threats due to the destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00055

A sun glass frog (Hyalinobatrachium aureoguttatum) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Durango, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Despite its local abundance in several sites and its adaptability to a certain degree of modification, this species faces serious threats due to the destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00054

A sun glass frog (Hyalinobatrachium aureoguttatum) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Durango, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Despite its local abundance in several sites and its adaptability to a certain degree of modification, this species faces serious threats due to the destruction of habitat, intensive agriculture and livestock, pollution, use of agrochemicals, mining, urban development.

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ANI110-00053

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00052

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00051

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

Photo

ANI110-00050

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

Photo

ANI110-00049

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00048

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00047

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00046

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00045

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00038

A western diurnal gecko (Gonatodes caudiscutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from El Carmen, Manabi Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00037

A western diurnal gecko (Gonatodes caudiscutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from El Carmen, Manabi Province, Ecuador.

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ANI110-00036

A Rio Santiago poison-dart frog (Dendrobates captivus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is being affected due to mining, habitat destruction, deforestation, urban development.

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ANI110-00035

A Rio Santiago poison-dart frog (Dendrobates captivus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is being affected due to mining, habitat destruction, deforestation, urban development.

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ANI110-00034

A Rio Santiago poison-dart frog (Dendrobates captivus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zamora Chinchipe Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is being affected due to mining, habitat destruction, deforestation, urban development.

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ANI101-00482

A rio morph of the tricolor poison dart frog (Epipedobates tricolor) at Centro Jamatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00481

A rio morph of the tricolor poison dart frog (Epipedobates tricolor) at Centro Jamatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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ANI101-00480

A cielito morph of the tricolor poison dart frog (Epipedobates tricolor) at Centro Jamatu in Quito, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI101-00479

A cielito morph of the tricolor poison dart frog (Epipedobates tricolor) at Centro Jamatu in Quito, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI088-00011

Two koala joeys (Phascolarctos cinereus) cling to each other, waiting to be placed with human caregivers at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital in Queensland. Once they’re old enough, they’ll be released into the wild.

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ANI061-00015

A male transcaspian urial (Ovis vignei arkal) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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ANI061-00014

A male transcaspian urial (Ovis vignei arkal) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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ANI061-00013

A male transcaspian urial (Ovis vignei arkal) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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BIR071-00066

Sumba hornbill (Rhyticeros everetti) at Bali Bird Park in Bali, Indonesia. The male has an auburn neck, the female black. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR071-00065

A male Sumba hornbill (Rhyticeros everetti) at Bali Bird Park in Bali, Indonesia. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR071-00064

A female Sumba hornbill (Rhyticeros everetti) at Bali Bird Park in Bali, Indonesia. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR071-00063

Sumba hornbill (Rhyticeros everetti) at Bali Bird Park in Bali, Indonesia. The male has an auburn neck, the female black. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR071-00062

A female Sumba hornbill (Rhyticeros everetti) at Bali Bird Park in Bali, Indonesia. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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BIR071-00061

A male Sumba hornbill (Rhyticeros everetti) at Bali Bird Park in Bali, Indonesia. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI083-00023

A Sumatran binturong (Arctictis binturong niasensis) at a private collection in Jakarta, Indonesia. This species is listed as vulnerable under the IUCN red list. This animal is under the care of PT. Alam Nusantara Jayatama.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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