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ESA001-00517

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00518

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00519

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00484

A endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird named Sara.

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ESA001-00165

Unplanned product of a foster-parent program for endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana), a “whoopill” was sired out of a whooper out of a great Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis canadensis). Having failed to produce a single breeding female, biologists have abandoned their efforts to create a viable flock of whooping cranes, whose numbers in the wild have crept from 51 in 1973 to about 165 today. Many think that, rather than struggling to restore a creature so near extinction, efforts should be concentrated on species in the early stages of danger.

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BIR003-00423

Sara the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species.

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BIR003-00422

Sara the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species.

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ESA001-00115

A whooping crane (Grus americana) at the Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, Louisiana. (US: Endangered, IUCN: Endangered)

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ESA001-00114

A whooping crane (Grus americana) at the Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, Louisiana. (US: Endangered, IUCN: Endangered)

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ESA001-00055

A whooping crane (Grus americana) at the Audubon Nature Institute, New Orleans, Louisiana. (US: Endangered, IUCN: Endangered)

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ESA001-00012

Sara the whooping crane (Grus americana), an educational bird at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. (US: Endangered; IUCN: Endangered)

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BIR051-00123

Whooping crane, (Grus americana), chicks at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00124

A health exam for whooping crane chicks, (Grus americana), at the International Crane Center. Shown are biologists and veterinarians wearing gray ‘sandhill crane’ costumes as they examine chicks, take measurements, and give shots. They all wear gray to mimic the colors of a ‘bad guy’ bird, the sandhill crane. White is worn only when they want to imitate whooper parents in positive situations only.

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BIR051-00125

A biologist at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00126

A pair of adult whooping cranes, (Grus americana), tend to a chick in a public exhibit area at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. They are raising a chick that is not their own, searching for food to bring it within their display marsh.

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BIR051-00122

Whooping cranes, (Grus americana), and their costumed trainers at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00111

A pair of adult whooping cranes, (Grus americana), tend to a chick in a public exhibit area at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. They are raising a chick that is not their own, searching for food to bring it within their display marsh.

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BIR051-00112

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana) forages for food in a display marsh at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, as part of a recovery program for the species.

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BIR051-00113

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana) forages for food in a display marsh at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, as part of a recovery program for the species.

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BIR051-00103

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana), tends to a chick in a public exhibit area at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, searching for food to bring it within their display marsh.

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BIR051-00104

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana), tends to a chick in a public exhibit area at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, searching for food to bring it within their display marsh.

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BIR051-00105

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana) forages for food in a display marsh at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, as part of a recovery program for the species.

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BIR051-00106

An egg of whooping crane, (Grus americana), begins to hatch at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00107

An egg of whooping crane, (Grus americana), begins to hatch at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00108

A whooper chick, (Grus americana), hatches at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00109

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana), tends to a chick in a public exhibit area at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, searching for food to bring it within their display marsh.

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BIR051-00110

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana) forages for food in a display marsh at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, as part of a recovery program for the species.

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BIR051-00099

A whooper chick, (Grus americana), hatches at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. Shown is the egg almost fully rotated and placed in front of sound speakers that play the purring calls of adult whoopers. This stimulates the chick to finish hatching.

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BIR051-00100

A whooper chick, (Grus americana), hatches at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00101

A whooper chick, (Grus americana), hatches at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI.

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BIR051-00102

A whooper chick, (Grus americana), hatches at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. A biologist removes the membrane from the shell for lab analysis.

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BIR051-00091

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana) forages for food in a display marsh at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, as part of a recovery program for the species.

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BIR051-00092

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana), tends to a chick in a public exhibit area at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, searching for food to bring it within their display marsh.

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BIR051-00093

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana) forages for food in a display marsh at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, as part of a recovery program for the species.

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BIR051-00094

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana) forages for food in a display marsh at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, as part of a recovery program for the species.

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BIR051-00095

An adult whooping crane (Grus americana), tends to a chick in a public exhibit area at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, WI. It is one of a pair of adults, raising a chick that is not their own, searching for food to bring it within their display marsh.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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