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ANI099-00127

This orphaned black-faced spider monkey, named Pulgoso, is full of surprise. Pulgoso, which translates to “full of fleas” was raised by a logger in Madidi after its mother was killed by poachers.

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ANI008-00036

Nose-to-nose, two Steller sea lion cows (Eumetopias jubata) have a vociferous argument about who invaded whose territory. These animals are always yelling at each other! Lowrie is a small island on the north end of Forrester National Wildlife Refuge; it serves as the rookery of the world’s largest concentration of these mammals. About 5,000 gather here at the height of the breeding/pupping season in late June and early July. Biologists puzzle over the fact that the species is faring so badly in relatively wild Alaska. Slow starvation may be the answer, since its principal food, pollock, has become increasingly popular with human competitors.

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BIR021-00087

Aplomado falcon (Falco femoralis pichinchae) a federally-listed species, at the Milford Nature Center.

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BIR021-00088

Aplomado falcon (Falco femoralis pichinchae) a federally-listed species, at the Milford Nature Center.

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INS014-00425

Wild nightcrawlers (Lumbricus terrestris) caught in Lincoln, Nebraska. These are considered an invasive species in the United States.

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WOL002-00127

A Mexican gray wolf pup licks his mother’s nose at the Sedgwick County Zoo in Wichita, KS.

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BIR057-00029

Dusky moorhen (Gallinula tenebrosa) at the Taronga Zoo.

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ANI077-00461

An orange corn snake wraps around a woman’s feet, Sea Island, Georgia.

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ANI077-00460

An orange corn snake wraps around a woman’s feet, Sea Island, Georgia.

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ANI080-00106

Turtles rest on a log at the Audubon Zoo, New Orleans, Louisiana.

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BIR011-00020

Wild black-crowned night heron at the Audubon Zoo, New Orleans, Louisiana.

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BIR003-00442

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00443

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00444

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00435

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00436

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00437

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00438

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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BIR003-00439

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00440

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00441

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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ANI042-00033

An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI042-00029

An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI042-00030

An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI042-00031

An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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ANI042-00032

An endangered Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) at the Houston Zoo.

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SCE053-00069

Small tree finch, Camarhynchus parvulus, from Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos.

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SCE053-00070

A zig zag spider, Neoscona cooksoni, with it’s prey, a juvenile painted locust, Schistocerca melanocera.

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SCE053-00066

A Galapagos tortoise, Chelonoidis vicina, at the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos.

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SCE053-00067

A Galapagos tortoise, Chelonoidis vicina, at the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos.

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SCE053-00068

A Galapagos tortoise, Chelonoidis vicina, at the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos.

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SCE053-00061

A critically endangered medium tree finch, Camarhynchus pauper, on Santa Cruz Island in Galapagos, Ecuador.

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SCE053-00062

A striated heron, Butorides striata, on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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