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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A young woman stand in front of “Zaanse Schans”, a historic windmill area, in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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A teenager jumps in excitement at the Sunken Gardens in Lincoln, NE.

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A young woman wears a heart mask on Valentine’s Day.

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Flemish giant rabbits are held by their owners at the Iowa State Fair.

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Two South African mastiffs and their owner at Virginia Beach, Virginia.

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A man and woman with their three South African mastiffs at Virginia Beach, Virginia.

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A woman with her three South African mastiffs at Virginia Beach, Virginia.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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Two women helping set up to photograph a rowi kiwi or Okarito kiwi (Apteryx rowi) at the West Coast Wildlife Centre in Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. This is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. This center is the place where they incubate eggs that are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A man and woman out searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman handles a baby black vulture (Coragyps atratus) at the WildCare Foundation.

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Zookeepers with a vulnerable, federally threatened female Steller’s eider (Polysticta stelleri) at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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Zookeepers with a vulnerable, federally threatened male Steller’s eider (Polysticta stelleri) at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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Zookeepers with a federally threatened male spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) at the Alaska SeaLife Center. This bird has been in decline since the 1980’s, attributed most likely to climate change and lead shot in their environment.

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Zookeepers with a vulnerable red-legged kittiwake (Rissa brevirostris) at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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Locals catch Nile perch and carry water from Lake Albert.

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A zoo keeper with ‘Poa’, a ten-month-old common wombat (Vombatus ursinus tasmaniensis) baby she’s handrearing at the Healesville Sanctuary.

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Two people watch a marathon from the comfort of theirhome.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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