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BIR021-00114

An American kestrel (Falco sparverius) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo.

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ANI073-00063

A vulnerable Egyptian Spiny-tailed Lizard (Uromastyx aegyptia)

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ONA007-00179

Staff members at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center assist with a photoshoot of ‘Megan’ an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). This animal came in after becoming entangled in fishing gear. Once rehabbed, the animal will be released in waters off the coast.

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ONA007-00180

Staff members at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center transport ‘Megan’ an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). This animal came in after becoming entangled in fishing gear. Once rehabbed, the animal will be released in waters off the coast.

Photo

ONA007-00181

Staff members at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center transport ‘Megan’ an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). This animal came in after becoming entangled in fishing gear. Once rehabbed, the animal will be released in waters off the coast.

Photo

ONA007-00182

Staff members at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center care for ‘Megan’ an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). This animal came in after becoming entangled in fishing gear. Once rehabbed, the animal will be released in waters off the coast.

Photo

ONA007-00174

Staff members at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center prepare for a photoshoot of ‘Megan’ an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). This animal came in after becoming entangled in fishing gear. Once rehabbed, the animal will be released in waters off the coast.

Photo

ONA007-00175

Staff members at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center assist with a photoshoot of ‘Megan’ an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). This animal came in after becoming entangled in fishing gear. Once rehabbed, the animal will be released in waters off the coast.

Photo

ONA007-00178

Staff members at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center transport ‘Megan’ an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea). This animal came in after becoming entangled in fishing gear. Once rehabbed, the animal will be released in waters off the coast.

Photo

ONA007-00173

Background made by Wrylie Guffey (shown in photo) for greater mouse-deer, greater Malay chevrotain or napu (Tragulus napu)at the Topeka Zoo

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ANI051-00149

A zoo keeper with ‘Poa’, a ten-month-old common wombat (Vombatus ursinus tasmaniensis) baby she’s handrearing at the Healesville Sanctuary.

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ANI051-00115

A zoo keeper with ‘Poa’, a ten-month-old common wombat baby she’s handrearing at Healesville Sanctuary in Healesville, Victoria, Australia.

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BIR003-00443

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00444

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00435

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00436

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00437

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00438

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00439

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00440

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00441

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

Photo

BIR003-00442

Zoo keepers wear crane costumes to bond with juvenile Mississippi sandhill cranes at the Audubon Species Survival Center, part of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana. With just 110 adults in the wild now, every chick counts, and so young birds are taught how to forage for food by their human ‘parents’ out in flight pens until it’s time to be released into the wild again.

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ANI019-00251

A zoo keeper tries to lure a bobcat (Lynx rufus) to Sartore’s photo studio at the Miller Park Zoo.

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ANI065-00496

The head herp keeper puts the king cobra back in its enclosure.

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ANI073-00197

Texas horned lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum) at the Fort Worth Zoo. This animal is in serious decline and has even been wiped out now in the Fort Worth area. This zoo has a captive breeding program for it.

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BIR021-00063

An American kestrel (Falco sparverius) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo.

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ANI075-00159

A scorpion mud turtle (Kinosternon scorpiodes) at the Chapultepec Zoo in Mexico City.

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BIR024-00085

A Harris’s hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus harrisi) is held by a handler at the New York State Zoo in Watertown, NY.

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ANI073-00093

A vulnerable Egyptian spiny-tailed Lizard (Uromastyx aegyptia) at the Buffalo Zoo.

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ANI073-00091

A vulnerable Egyptian spiny-tailed Lizard (Uromastyx aegyptia) at the Buffalo Zoo.

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ANI073-00090

A vulnerable Egyptian spiny-tailed Lizard (Uromastyx aegyptia) at the Buffalo Zoo.

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ANI073-00044

A panther chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo.

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ANI018-00044

An endangered Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) with handler.

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ANI018-00037

An endangered Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) with handler.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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